My Favorite Thriller This Year So Far! Plus, a Favorite Streaming Series and Podcast!

First, let me say I hope you’ve all weathered 2020 and that this year has been gentler and kinder, and you’ve found some kind of normal. It’s been rough, but we sure are resilient, aren’t we?

We survived the Holiday Farm Fire here in Oregon and luckily our house didn’t burn. But so many friends’ homes did not make it. It took a long time to find my footing and get back to doing some things like this blog.

I’ve been reading a lot, but it took this one thriller to snap me back into action and write a review. I have a few more notes on other reads, streaming series, and audiobooks to recommend after this review. In the meantime, grab this thriller. I’m calling it out as noir. It has all the characteristics, and I’m so lucky to have read an advanced reader copy. So here you go.

Early in a thriller, I can usually guess—or have a decent idea—of who the antagonist is.

With Hannah Mary McKinnon’s You Will Remember Me, it seemed easy, almost too easy. Why would an author make it obvious? What the heck was McKinnon doing?

I can’t answer that or even hint at it, but I can say this. When a story starts with a man on a Maryland beach with amnesia, then you find he’s living two lives, another in Maine, you hope it’s going to be a twisted, wicked ride. This was, indeed, that kind of ride.

In You Will Remember Me the secret lives of the characters get deeper and more complex as the story unfolds. McKinnon drips backstories into the novel thus building suspense and twisting the reader’s allegiances. The author handles multiple voices so well I had whiplash as to what was happening and who to trust. The novel could be categorized as noir because it’s suspenseful, dark, creepy, and surprising. And, oh, that ending! Lisa Unger called it “utterly diabolical.” I totally agree.

#YouWillRememberMe #NetGalley


MORE RECOMMENDATIONS

The following are in no particular order, but I’m sticking to noir or noir-ish recommendations with a few notes on each.

I belong to a “Hard-Boiled Book Club.” For those who don’t know what hard-boiled fiction is, here’s the Encyclopedia Brittanica’s definition:

Hard-boiled fiction–a tough, unsentimental style of American crime writing that brought a new tone of earthy realism or naturalism to the field of detective fiction. Hard-boiled fiction used graphic sex and violence, vivid but often sordid urban backgrounds, and fast-paced, slangy dialogue.


A CLASSIC HARD-BOILED

Everyone in the group plus my husband loved The Conjure-Man Dies by Rudolph Fisher. Classified as a Harlem Mystery, it was much more than that–humorous, insightful, with characters who were sharp and witty. He also wrote with his knowledge of medical science, giving us an accurate portrayal of Harlem in the 1930s. This was the first detective novel written by an African-American, a distinguished doctor, accomplished musician, and dramatist. Unfortunately, he died in 1934 at the age of 37. I can’t imagine what he could have written if he’d lived longer.


STREAMING

I highly recommend Perry Mason the not-so-new but brillian series on HBO. Why? Because so many didn’t get the point of this show–it’s a prequel to the original or in other words an origin story.

I think it’s a brilliant take on Perry Mason in 1932 Los Angeles. At first he’s a down-and-out PI, then he’s terrible as a lawyer. Nothing goes right.

I’d classify this series as neo-noir, as it’s gritty, atmospheric, and grim at times. Unlike the PM we see in the original, this PM is haunted by his wartime experiences in France, probably suffering with PTSD, and also from a broken marriage.

Matthew Rhys knocks it out of the park with his portrayal of the main character. It’s amazing that he’s Welsh and has such a thick accent, but captures an American character brilliantly. (Yes, I have a bit of a crush on him. So sue me.)

Even though this is an origin story, I think it stands on its own. PM is not a hero of the courtroom and the ending shows the reality of the times, but Mason does expose the truth of the crime. Give it a shot if you haven’t already. The brilliant cast and sets top this off as one of my favorite all-time series after The Americans and The Wire.

Perry Mason was executive produced by Susan Downey and Robert Downey, Jr. I am so thrilled Robert Downey, Jr. survived all his trials and has come to this successful point in his life.

For a fascinating look behind the scenes at the sets, GO HERE. The people who worked on this film makes the LA of the 30s come alive. History, culture, socio-economic turbulence are reflected in so much of the story telling.


PODCAST

This one I’d call a page-turner if there were pages. Maybe an episode turner? it was also a rabbit hole for me because after this podcast, I listened and watched everything I could about Hodel, his family, the Black Dahlia, and the Surrealist artists of the day.

My main fascination focused on how art, particularly the Surrealists, influenced the killing of Elizabeth Short, the Black Dahlia. From everything i read and listened to, I think Hodel, a surgeon, wanted to outdo the other surrealists to prove himself the ultimate artist by creating a surrealist version of murder. Yes, the man was sick because he probably killed many other women, but in this killing, he replicated a famous Surrealist painting by Man Ray, a friend. He also embraced the Surrealists’ hedonistic lifestyle along with blatantly treating women as objects for whatever purpose they deemed necessary. Hodel’s son, a former LAPD homicide detective, believes his father was the killer.

Man Ray’s “Minotaure”

“This is dad’s surrealistic masterpiece,” he told Dr. Phil. “I talk about his scalpel being his paintbrush and her body was the canvas. It’s that twisted.” I think Hodel was a psychopathic narcissist who wanted to be a famous artist and was competitive to a degree that he found a way to outdo Man Ray. Women were just objects for their pleasure. I’d hold many of the members of LA law enforcement and the Hollywood establishment guilty too of his crimes as they continued to let Hodel off the hook because he provided secret abortions and gave out pharmaceuticals to people who ranked high in the LA establishment.

For more on the art aspect of the case, click on THIS LINK.


Thanks for stopping by!

Valerie J. Brooks

I’m the author of the psychological femme-noir thriller Revenge in 3 Parts the first in the Angeline Porter Trilogy. The second in the trilogy Tainted Times 2 will be available Sept. 1, 2020. I live in the McKenzie River Valley of Oregon with my husband Dan and our Havanese pooch Stevie Nicks.

CLICK HERE to sign up for my newsletter and keep up to date on my reviews, publications, and behind-the-scene stories of interest–like how I work with a cover artist, how I get my info about the FBI, what I’m going to do for the next novel, photos of my research, and some of my tricks and secrets for plotting twists and suspense. I’ll be launching a number of new projects soon that I’m sure you’ll want to know about.

Also, follow me on social media. I love my friends and fans!

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