We Should All Resist the Trap of the “Dead Girl Industrial Complex”

These Women Ivy Pochoda

I’m a big fan of Ivy Pochoda. Part of my fangirl heart-thumps come from her NOT focusing on the serial killer. Instead, she brings us the world of the women affected by the killer. I cheer that she doesn’t prioritize the experience of the aggressor. In fact, in her latest novel that I review, we don’t need to know much about him as he’s fairly ordinary and uninteresting, as many of them are.

After my review, I’ve given a link to an interview with Pochoda. Leah Carroll states in the Refinery29 interview:

… (Pochoda) amplifies and interweaves the voices of those who are too often silenced, thereby offering a nuanced, impactful portrait of the effects of violence on a community of women.

Fetishizing killers has caused a serious disassociation in how we read and write. Many of the women authors who are writing thrillers now have taken the approach of focusing on the families affected by the killer.

In fact, over a year ago, I stopped listening to the podcast MY FAVORITE MURDER. At first, I listened to it with the idea that the podcasters, two women comedians, had found a new way of bringing our attention to crimes that had been committed. But after a while, I began to feel sickened that I was laughing at how these stories were presented. What about the victims? Was there anything funny about them or their families or the sickos who were doing the murders? I’d been caught up in the antics and the funny storytelling when in fact, these were real stories about real people who had had their lives upended and had to deal with traumatic loss.

So I salute Ivy Pochoda. It’s always a risk to write against the cultural tide, but she triumphs in her new novel.

My Review

Ivy Pochoda’s THESE WOMEN is an inspired novel and one of my favorites of the year so far–and for a very good and unexpected reason. This psychological thriller doesn’t focus on who the serial killer is or why he does what he does.

Instead, the suspense is built around five black and Latina women, most of them sex workers, living in the same area as sex workers who were killed in the 90s. The killer was never found. Now women are being killed again in the same manner–slit throat and thrown from a car. The story follows these five women’s intertwined lives in their neighborhood in south L.A. 

snuggled up reading on my Kindle

‘Feelia opens the novel in 1999 and pulls you into her world with tough talk and street wisdom. She’s in the hospital because she forgot her own advice. When you work the streets, you’ve got to be “diligent.” The beep-beep-beep of the hospital machines sound in the background as she tells us about the hard game on the streets where she hangs with her 5th of Hennessy and pack of Pall Malls. How she didn’t pay attention that day when she was smoking and staring up at the trees that were dancing like a couple of drunk girls at a party—sway, sway, sway—and was talked into a car by a slick man who cut her throat and tossed her aside like garbage.

When Dorian’s story starts, it’s 2014. Young girls gather at her fish shack, spouting profanity and taunting her. Dorian lost her daughter Lecia to the killer years ago and has lapses, sometimes thinking she recognizes Lecia hanging with these girls. Sometimes she has heartbreaking visits from Lecia. Kathy, another sex worker, frequents the fish shack and seems unsatisfied with everything Dorian tries to do for her. Dorian is not only tries to save her fish shack, she also tries to save Julianna, who looks like Dorian’s dead daughter and who becomes a major target of the serial killer.

Ivy Pochoda

Ivy Pochoda adeptly creates a noir atmosphere throughout the novel with fires in the hills filling the air with smoke. Dead hummingbirds are left at Dorian’s doorstep. Green parrots fly by and roost in the palms. NPR follows the news of a young black man shot by police at point-blank range. Class issues arise when Dorian loses a catering job because she won’t use the back door of an upscale house, and the wife notices that Dorian knows her husband. No one in authority cares about sex workers dying, and Dorian continues over fifteen years to plague the authorities to find out who killed her daughter.

As their stories overlap and collide, we’re drawn inevitably to the shocking identity of the serial killer–shocking from the women’s viewpoint.

Even the arrest of the killer disturbs the neighborhood, and even though justice is served, peace is not around the corner. I bought a copy of this beautiful, haunting novel so that I can reread it.

THESE WOMEN, I hope, should become a classic.

Thank you for the ARC. #TheseWomen #NetGalley #HarperCollins

Rating: 5 out of 5.

INTERVIEW: “How Ivy Pochoda Resisted The Trap Of The ‘Dead Girl Industrial Complex'” by Leah Carrol for Refinery29

CLICK ON THIS LINK TO READ: “These Women TV Series Based On Book In Works From Handmaid’s Tale Creator Bruce Miller & MGM/UA TV”

Other books by Ivy Pochoda


I’m the author of the psychological femme-noir thriller Revenge in 3 Parts the first in the Angeline Porter Trilogy. The second in the trilogy Tainted Times 2 will be available Sept. 1, 2020. I live in the McKenzie River Valley of Oregon with my husband Dan and our Havanese pooch Stevie Nicks.

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